Walk with Delhi Dallying at the Delhi Walk Festival

Delhi Dallying is leading two walks at the Delhi Walk Festival this February, exploring the hidden facets of Shahjahanabad and Hauz-i-Khas. Tickets are priced at INR 400. Come join us!

Trades & Treasures of Old Delhi
February 23, 4.00pm – 6.00pm

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This tour explores the bustling marketplaces of the old city and traces the complex web of commerce and culture that had made the city thrive for years now. You shall start from the familiar main street of Chandni Chowk, but soon slip into by-lanes and gallis, walking through big and small, permanent and temporary bazaars of all shapes and sizes. Once on this ‘other’ side, you’ll start looking at the old city very differently. Buy Tickets.

 

 

Hauz Khas Special
February 26, 4.00pm – 6.00pm
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Hauz Khas has attracted kings, saints, scholars, artists and musicians to its banks for over eight hundred years. Arguably the seat of contemporary creative practice and subversive culture in Delhi, it has also become one of the most polarizing neighbourhoods in the city. On the Hauz Khas Special walking tour, explore the social, cultural and economic dynamics of the urban village over the years and define why it is so unique. Buy Tickets.

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Walk 1

September 8th, 2012

Walk 1

It’s a fairly pleasant Saturday morning. All of us gather at exit number 2 of the Chandni Chowk Metro Station. Rohan is late (as usual) and we can’t start the walk until he comes because he’s got the route maps printed for everyone. Friends from college, their friends from outside college, and some new friends who read about us online, join us on our very first walk of the Delhi Dallying Walk Series. 30 people, brimming nervous energy. And we begin with Walk 1.

Walk 1 is interesting because it takes you through the residential pockets around Chandni Chowk, sharing with you a slice of the vernacular life in Old Delhi. It consciously misses the touristy spots, to introduce you to the more everyday things of Shahjahanabad. While moving from the eastern end of Chandni Chowk towards the west, through the galis, it loosely weaves together a chronologically sound narrative, with bits of lip-smackingly good food thrown in.

Summarizing, from the treasurers’ haveli in Gali Khazanchi  to the beautiful Jain mohalla of Naughara, we explored the 17th century grandeur of Shahjahan’s reign (along with some 21st century jalebis and samosas). While moving through Maliwara towards Nai Sadak, the remnants of the Maratha siege and the mutiny of 1857 became apparent. Ballimaran and Mirza Ghalib’s Haveli are a testament to the days after the revolt, and also home to the famous Hakims of the Sharifkhani clan, which made for some very interesting haveli hopping.

Coming back onto Chandni chowk, after a small breakfast of kachouri-aloo and the elusive Nagori Halwa, we explored a part of Lala Chunamal’s stunning haveli (a little hushed as we did not seek permission from the current tenants!), who happened to be one of the most influential characters during the revolt. Entering the bustle of Khari Baoli, we went up to the hidden flower market of Fatehpuri, explored the fascinating view from the eerily enchanting  Garodia spice market, and concluded at the recently completed, austerely modern Polyclinic for the Destitute at Lahori Gate, leaving everyone to ponder about what modernity really means for the contemporary old city.

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Walk 1 is a great way to start a conversation with Shahjahanabad, which is a city within a city – one which we tend to be oblivious to, but one which enchants and entices.